Tag Archives: murderabilia

American Sniper, Murderabilia, and an activist’s attempt to bring it to an end

Chris Kyle is seen in this 2012 photo. 

Eddie Routh, the man who killed “American Sniper” Chris Kyle and his friend Chad Littlefield four years ago at a gun range in Erath County, is serving life in prison without the possibility of parole in a Texas Department of Criminal Justice unit near Palestine.

His writings and two crudely-drawn pieces of artwork are being sold online to the highest bidder: the latest example of “murderabilia” that a victim advocate and now Chris Kyle’s family would like to lawmakers to stop.

“He wanted to have some kind of fame,” Jeff Kyle said of the man who killed his brother. “He got some fame alright, for being a coward.”

In Robinson, Texas — south of Waco, the days and the anger for Jeff Kyle are still sometimes tough to fight through.

“The person that took that life,” he told us, “they don’t even deserve the breath that

Read more at: http://www.myfoxzone.com/features/american-sniper-murderabilia-and-an-activists-attempt-to-bring-it-to-an-end/415464646

Murderabilia for sale: Fort Hood shooter’s views on mass shooting

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department via The Temple Daily Telegram shows Nidal Hasan. In a video released Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012, many of those affected by the shooting rampage three years ago at Fort Hood urged the government to declare it a terrorist attack, saying wounded soldiers and victims' relatives otherwise won't receive the same benefits as those in a combat zone. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriff's Department via The Temple Daily Telegram, File) Photo: Uncredited, HOPD / Bell County Sheriff's Department

In a handwritten book believed to be penned by Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hasan, the convicted killer claims his actions were taken “in defense of Islam” by a “sincere Muslim.”

Read more at: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Murderabilia-for-sale-Fort-Hood-shooter-s-views-10645891.php

Murderabilia and True Crime Collecting

Murderabilia and True Crime Collecting looks in depth at the collectible world of Murderabilia and delves closely into the cultural impact of murderer and serial killer culture in contemporary society. Through interviews with some of the world’s most prolific and notorious murderers and serial killers this book discusses their point of view on serial killer artwork and crafts being freely available in the public domain and the issues that exist between killer, collector and victim. Featuring exclusive interviews with: Dennis Nilsen, Wayne Lo, Ian Brady, Joel Rifkin, Nico Claux and many more. Also including artwork from: John Wayne, Danny Rolling, Ottis Toole, Issei Sagawa, plus lots of images of some of the most unusual crafts and memorabilia affiliated with some of the most infamous killers of our time. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in, Murderabilia, true crime and serial killer culture. “Murderabilia and True Crime Collecting is the definitive book on the subject of Murderabilia and related serial killer culture”.

Murderabilia: Inside the weird online market for serial killer artifacts

Eric Holler, like lots of business owners, says his biggest months of the year fall between Halloween and Christmas. But, his wares aren’t your typical stocking stuffers: Holler runs Serial Killers Ink, one of the top sites for what’s known as murderabilia — collectibles owned by real-life mass murderers, from their letters and paintings to their underwear.

“People are getting in the mood for spooky, dark things,” Holler said by phone from his home in Jacksonville, Fla., where he has run Serial Killers Ink since 2009. “But it also has to do with Christmas shopping.”

Gift options for your loved ones this holiday season could include this crude watercolor painting, titled ‘Angelic Rain,’ going for $50 by Teodoro Baez, a Chicago man who murdered and dismembered two people with a Samurai

Read more at: http://theweek.com/articles/662522/murderabilia-inside-weird-online-market-serial-killer-artifacts

Items from suspected Ashland serial killer for sale on ‘murderabilia’ website

ASHLAND, Ohio– Tracings of suspected serial killer Shawn Grate’s hands are listed on the “murderabilia” website Serial Killers Ink.

Grate was arrested after a woman called police from a house on Covert Court in Ashland on Sept. 13. The victim said Grate held her captive. After she was rescued, investigators began discovering bodies.

The 40-year-old is accused of killing four women and faces more than 23 counts, including murder, kidnapping and abuse of a corpse. Authorities said he confessed to the crimes. His trial is scheduled to start on Nov. 6, 2017.

Two tracings of Grate’s hands appear on the Serial Killers Ink for $50 each. Both are listed as out of stock.

“Signed in full with Christian childrens prayer at the top of the page and Christian inspirational words on each of the five fingers. Five is a reocurring theme in many of Grate’s items as it represents the five victims attributed to him. The

Read more at: http://fox8.com/2016/11/07/items-from-suspected-ashland-serial-killer-for-sale-on-murderabilia-website/

Murderabilia: The Market For Serial Killer Merch

Eric Holler, like lots of business owners, says his biggest months of the year fall between Halloween and Christmas. But, his wares aren’t your typical stocking stuffers: Holler runs Serial Killers Ink, one of the top sites for what’s known as murderabilia — collectibles owned by real-life mass murderers, from their letters and paintings to their underwear.

“People are getting in the mood for spooky, dark things,” Holler said by phone from his home in Jacksonville, Fla., where he has run Serial Killers Ink since 2009. “But it also has to do with Christmas shopping.”

Gift options for your loved ones this holiday season could include this crude watercolor painting, titled Angelic Rain, going for $50 by Teodoro Baez, a Chicago man who murdered and dismembered two people with a Samurai sword in 1999 over a drug dispute, and was sentenced to death in 2004.

Why collectors are drawn to ‘murderabilia’

By Wyatt Massey, Special to CNN

As the saying goes, you can buy anything online. Just ask Eric Holler.

Holler runs Serial Killers Ink, an Internet marketplace specializing in “murderabilia”: collectible items related to murders or violent crimes. They include handwritten letters and artwork such as an oil painting of a clown by John Wayne Gacy, who was executed in 1994 for murdering 33 boys and young men in Chicago.

Some people may find his venture distasteful. But Holler sees little difference between selling items associated with violent crime and the many movies, TV shows and video games that capitalize on it.

“Murder and mayhem is a moneymaking business,” he said. “I think there’s a little bit of darkness in us all. We all want to walk to the edge.”
In this Halloween season, Holler is certainly not alone in his ghoulish fascination. A collection of watercolors and drawings by Adolf Hitler sold for nearly $450,000 at auction last summer in Germany. One of the most popular exhibits at Washington’s recently shuttered Crime Museum was a display of paintings by Gacy, who buried dozens of his victims in a crawl space below his home.

And a number of true-crime aficionados collect items related to notorious killers. Holler says sales have increased every year since he launched his website in 2009.

Buying and selling “murderabilia” is legal. But is it moral? For some observers, that’s a much more difficult question.

Read more at: http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/23/living/murderabilia-artwork-serial-killers-hitler-feat/

‘Murderabilia’ is the star at Mad Mobster Chicago

G. William Harder, self-described Satanist, self-proclaimed good friend to bad people, collector of serial-killer letters and prison art, proprietor of the website murderauction.com and seller of “Got Satan?” T-shirts, stroked habitually at his chin. He gathered together the strands of dry brush that he calls a goatee and tugged them into a spike. He wore a white shirt, long baggy black shorts, a skinny black tie and a pentagram pin on his collar. A middle-aged man was telling him that he knew someone who knew someone who searched Jeffrey Dahmer’s house in Milwaukee — one of the police officers who raided the killer’s home in 1991 — and found a severed head in the refrigerator. Harder listened closely but did not look especially impressed.

Why would he?

Dahmer had only come up in conversation because the man was admiring a piece of original poetry from Dahmer that Harder had tracked down and

Read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/ct-murderabilia-at-mad-mobster-chicago-20150215-column.html