Inside the mind of Australia’s most infamous serial killers: US dealer sells letters and art from twisted murderers …

He’s the man who makes a living peddling items for the world’s most sadistic serial killers.

Eric Holler’s Serial Killer Ink is billed as a ‘true crime collectibles’ site, selling the belongings and art of ‘mass shooters, cannibals and necrophiles.’

The once-aspiring cop from Florida contacts inmates behind bars – including Australians Ivan Milat and John Bunting – to commission ‘murderabilia’.

The 47-year-old told Daily Mail Australia he has no qualms paying bloodthirsty villains to ‘help them out’. And he remains defiant in the face of the furore he’s drawn.

Crime pays: Eric Holler (posing at the grave of US musician Leon wilkesonl) makes a living peddling items for the world's most infamous serial killers

Crime pays: Eric Holler (posing at the grave of US musician Leon wilkesonl) makes a living peddling items for the world’s most infamous

Read more at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4495652/Inside-mind-Australia-s-worst-serial-killers.html

Inside the mind of Australia’s worst serial killers

He’s the man who makes a living peddling items for the world’s most infamous serial killers.

Eric Holler’s Serial Killer Ink is billed as a ‘true crime collectibles’ site, selling the belongings and art of ‘mass shooters, cannibals and necrophiles.’

The once-aspiring cop, based in Florida, contacts inmates behind bars –  including Australian murderers Ivan Milat and John Bunting – to commission ‘murderabilia’.

The 47-year-old told Daily Mail Australia he has no qualms paying bloodthirsty villains to ‘help them out’. And he remains defiant in the face of the furore he’s drawn.

Crime pays: Eric Holler (posing at the grave of US musician Leon wilkesonl) makes a living peddling items for the world's most infamous serial killers

Crime pays: Eric Holler (posing at the grave of US musician Leon wilkesonl) makes a living peddling items for the world’s

Read more at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4495652/Inside-mind-Australia-s-worst-serial-killers.html

Sellers cashing in on Aaron Hernandez’s swag

Aaron Hernandez’s jailhouse suicide has opportunists stampeding to online auction and murderabilia sites with autographed jerseys, mini-helmets and sports cards to cash in on his notoriety.

A Connecticut resident turned to Craigslist three days after the 27-year-old’s shocking April 19 death in hopes of selling an NFL-stamped autographed photo “of the late great Bristol (Conn.) native, Aaron Hernandez,” for $1,500, the post read.

The owner states: “I purchased it before he was ever arrested, still got love for the ex Patriot. Rip.”

But Joe Habib, owner of Grand Slam Sports Cards and Collectibles in East Bridgewater, advises buyers beware, regardless of where they go shopping.

“This is one of those things that people go crazy to find something and buy it, and then after the craze it’s worth absolutely nothing,” Habib said yesterday. “Prior to him killing himself, over a week or two there was a total of 20 things sold

Read more at: http://www.bostonherald.com/news/local_coverage/2017/04/sellers_cashing_in_on_aaron_hernandez_s_swag

Coal Mine Theatre’s Orphans appears gripping and clever, but offers limited depth

From the U.K. comes Orphans, a play about urban fear that is gripping and clever, but ultimately hollow.

The literal orphans of Dennis Kelly’s play are Helen and Liam, a brother and sister in their 20s who lost their parents in a fire when they were children. Helen is now married to Danny who unlike his wife and brother-in-law speaks with a BBC accent, and so may be taken to embody middle-class liberal values. We are told that Danny has a good job though not what it is; I reckon he’s a teacher.

Helen and Liam are still close, so close that Liam has a key to Helen and Danny’s house, and is likely to turn up unexpectedly. Which is what he does at the beginning of the play, interrupting a nice celebratory dinner for two. Liam is nervous and covered in blood. He explains, sometimes haltingly, sometimes in a rush, that

Read more at: http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/on-stage/coal-mine-theatres-orphans-appears-gripping-and-clever-but-offers-limited-depth

On Dan, Dean and the Draft

On March 31, two days after returning from a historic NFL owners meeting in Arizona (for several reasons), NFL commissioner Roger Goodell flew to Pittsburgh to see the ailing Steelers owner, Dan Rooney. Goodell feared what he might see. Rooney, 84 and seriously ill, was now in a rehabilitation facility with major back problems and an undisclosed ailment. Goodell hadn’t seen him since Super Bowl Sunday in Houston.

When Goodell opened the door to Rooney’s room, Rooney was in bed, too weak to get up and greet him. A slim man already, Rooney had lost weight. But when he saw Goodell, Rooney smiled broadly.

“Commissioner,” Rooney said.

Goodell didn’t want to get emotional just then. It was difficult. “I flashed back,” Goodell said Sunday afternoon. “It was exactly the same thing he’d said to me once before.”

Eerily, it was. Same word, same smile too, as on a hot day in August 2006, in a

Read more at: http://www.foxsports.com/nfl/story/dan-rooney-dean-blandino-nfl-draft-peter-king-041717

The DNA of a Killer

Correspondent: Anne-Marie Green; Producers: Judy Rybak, Elena DiFiore, Lindsey Schwartz and Chris O’Connell

Nearly two decades after 18-year-old Angie Dodge was brutally murdered in her Idaho Falls, Idaho, apartment, police were still hunting for the killer who left his DNA at the crime scene, while a man who did not match the DNA was serving a 30-year sentence for participating in the crime.

In 2014, police took a new and very controversial approach to try to find a match to that DNA. They searched a public DNA database owned by Ancestry.com, hoping to find someone related to Angie’s killer. They got a close enough match to make them think they had found the killer’s family tree – and there they found what they believed to be their man: a young New Orleans filmmaker who happened to have produced a short film about a girl’s brutal death.

But was he?

“Nobody

Read more at: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-dna-of-a-killer-who-murdered-idaho-teen-angie-dodge/

Ask Boswell: Redskins, Nationals and Washington sports

This is factually correct. But it is also about as lame as it gets.

Dusty’s quote: “These start times, you don’t know whether to eat, go to sleep, use the bathroom or shower. You have to set your alarm clock different days and times…It’s like working night shift, day shift, swing shift.”

Sorry, doesn’t wash. The Nats started the season with three at home, then three in Philly (a five-minute bus trip) then six at home.  In those 12 games they also had two days off. So, their first dozen games were as easy as it gets: home or in Philly.

Now they get a day off before three in Atlanta. Excuse me, DAY OFF. So, the three in Atlanta are a piece of cake. That’s a 15-game sweetheart schedule. They played some 4 p.m. games. The other teams had to play at 4 pm, too.

Then they have to fly from Atlanta to

Read more at: https://live.washingtonpost.com/ask-boswell-20170417.html

SI Uncovers The Brady Jersey Thief’s Ebay Feedback Page

Maddie Meyer/Getty

Robert Klemko and Jenny Vrentas have a deep dive today on the Tom Brady Super Bowl jersey theft—it’s even part of Sports Illustrated’s “True Crime” series —and it’s an interesting look at the complicated steps law enforcement had to take in order to retrieve the Super Bowl LI jersey. Cops recovered it, along with Brady’s jersey from Super Bowl XLIX and Von Miller’s helmet from Super Bowl 50, from Martín Mauricio Ortega, the former director of the La Prensa tabloid in Mexico City.

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The story details one of the law enforcement sources in the case: A 19-year-old, Dylan Wagner, who once sold a game-worn Deion Branch jersey to Ortega. Wagner corresponded with Ortega after the sale, and Ortega sent him photos of his memorabilia collection,

Read more at: http://deadspin.com/si-uncovers-the-brady-jersey-thief-s-ebay-feedback-page-1794220236

Tom Brady Super Bowl jersey thief investigation | Longform – MMQB

NFL security officials return to Mexico for a second time, to provide any last-minute assistance before the plan to recover the shirt is executed. They leave before the raid, handing the operation to Mexican authorities.

On the Ortegas’ front door, a decorative letter O hung slightly askew, joined by a cartoon bunny in overalls, carrots dangling from its right hand. When a reporter knocked, there was no answer. A next-door neighbor said she had not seen Ortega in many days (and was promptly scolded by a male companion for talking to the press). Phone calls to Ortega’s home were answered by a housekeeper who promised to relay messages. Ortega did not respond to numerous emails and voicemails.

To those who know him and worked with him, his love of football and the pageantry of the Super Bowl was no secret.

Every year for at least a decade Ortega

Read more at: https://www.si.com/longform/true-crime/tom-brady-patriots-super-bowl-jersey-thief-mmqb/

The Great Super Bowl Jersey Caper

NFL security officials return to Mexico for a second time, to provide any last-minute assistance before the plan to recover the shirt is executed. They leave before the raid, handing the operation to Mexican authorities.

On the Ortegas’ front door, a decorative letter O hung slightly askew, joined by a cartoon bunny in overalls, carrots dangling from its right hand. When a reporter knocked, there was no answer. A next-door neighbor said she had not seen Ortega in many days (and was promptly scolded by a male companion for talking to the press). Phone calls to Ortega’s home were answered by a housekeeper who promised to relay messages. Ortega did not respond to numerous emails and voicemails.

To those who know him and worked with him, his love of football and the pageantry of the Super Bowl was no secret.

Every year for at least a decade Ortega

Read more at: https://www.si.com/longform/true-crime/tom-brady-patriots-super-bowl-jersey-thief-mmqb/