Monthly Archives: September 2016

‘Southwest of Salem’ Is ‘Queering True Crime’

Deborah Esquenazi was working as a radio reporter in Texas when she first heard of the San Antonio Four. A journalism mentor from New York, Debbie Nathan, sent her the court transcripts of the case, which centered around four Latina lesbians convicted of the gang rape of two children.

The case had haunted Nathan, who authored the 2001 book Satan’s Silence: Ritual Abuse and the Making of a Modern American Witch Hunt. She urged Esquenazi to look into it. “This could be you,” she said. “This could happen again.”

At the time, Esquenazi was closeted, so the idea of an investigation involving four queer women seemed beyond what she was ready to face. But then she saw the VHS tapes — home videos of the women and their families before the nightmare that awaited them in the criminal justice system. Esquenazi was struck and saddened by the joy on display.

“It was really

Read more at: http://www.advocate.com/film/2016/9/30/southwest-salem-queering-true-crime

Sale Of Prison Artwork Draws Ire Of Skinner Relatives

But when Walker found out recently that a website is selling artwork created by the Elmira man convicted as the ring leader in those killings, it was like an old wound was ripped open again.

Davide Coggins, 37, is currently serving a 50-year to life sentence at Attica Correctional Facility for his role in the April 2013 murders of Town of Carroll residents Gordon and Joyce Skinner, who were family relations.

Coggins apparently has been painting artwork in prison, and one of his pieces is for sale on a website known as serialkillersink.net.

The idea that anyone, inmates or otherwise, could profit from such a horrific crime is nauseating, Walker said.

“It feels just like another kick in the stomach, that he’s getting away with one more thing. We didn’t even know something like this existed,” she said. “You see things on TV or in the movies but you don’t expect it to be

Read more at: http://www.post-journal.com/news/page-one/2016/09/sale-of-prison-artwork-draws-ire-of-skinner-relatives/

Killers’ artwork for sale; victims’ kin sickened

Julie Walker lives every day with the anguish caused by the murders of her aunt and uncle in the Jamestown area.

But when Walker recently discovered a website is selling artwork created by the Elmira man convicted as the ringleader in those killings, it was like an old wound was ripped open again.

Davide Coggins, 37, is serving a 50-years-to-life sentence at Attica Correctional Facility for his role in the April 2013 murders of Carroll residents Gordon and Joyce

Read more at: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2016/09/17/killers-artwork-sale-victims-kin-sickened/90580306/

PROFIT FROM MURDER: Killers’ artwork for sale – Elmira Star

Julie Walker lives every day with the anguish caused by the murders of her aunt and uncle in the Jamestown area.

But when Walker recently discovered a website is selling artwork created by the Elmira man convicted as the ringleader in those killings, it was like an old wound was ripped open again.

Davide Coggins, 37, is serving a 50-year-to-life sentence at Attica Correctional Facility for his role in the April 2013

Read more at: http://www.stargazette.com/story/news/crime/2016/09/16/profiting-murder/90127722/

Wave of dark new shows mark true crime genre’s revival

And the shows now emerging may be the most troubling and important yet.

Long dismissed as lowbrow, exploitational and, in some cases, pornographic pulp, the genre that fed our guilty fascination with Charles Manson, the Black Dahlia and the alarming number of “nice, normal” men who kill their wives/girlfriends/fiancees is suddenly being taken seriously.

The success of the podcast “Serial,” the FX drama “The People v. O.J. Simpson” and multiple docuseries, including “The Jinx” (HBO) and “Making a Murderer” (Netflix), have raised true crime from the lowbrow populism of “Forensic Files,” “Homicide Hunter” and “Dateline.”

Not content with the increasing darkness and moral ambivalence of scripted crime drama, television writers and audiences began going straight to the source.

Not since Truman Capote wrote “In Cold Blood” has nonfictional brutality been the center of so much artistic treatment, used as a fulcrum for our need for authenticity and social awareness — and our desire to

Read more at: http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/features/ae/4115225-wave-dark-new-shows-mark-true-crime-genres-revival

Wave of dark new shows mark true crime genre’s revival | Duluth …

And the shows now emerging may be the most troubling and important yet.

Long dismissed as lowbrow, exploitational and, in some cases, pornographic pulp, the genre that fed our guilty fascination with Charles Manson, the Black Dahlia and the alarming number of “nice, normal” men who kill their wives/girlfriends/fiancees is suddenly being taken seriously.

The success of the podcast “Serial,” the FX drama “The People v. O.J. Simpson” and multiple docuseries, including “The Jinx” (HBO) and “Making a Murderer” (Netflix), have raised true crime from the lowbrow populism of “Forensic Files,” “Homicide Hunter” and “Dateline.”

Not content with the increasing darkness and moral ambivalence of scripted crime drama, television writers and audiences began going straight to the source.

Not since Truman Capote wrote “In Cold Blood” has nonfictional brutality been the center of so much artistic treatment, used as a fulcrum for our need for authenticity and social awareness — and our desire to

Read more at: http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/features/ae/4115225-wave-dark-new-shows-mark-true-crime-genres-revival